Geoff Moore – The Distance – 1987

This was Geoff’s last solo album before putting together a band and being Geoff Moore and the Distance. There must be some correlation between this album being call The Distance and his subsequent band being named The Distance but I don’t know what it was. The band for this album consisted of Dan Huff, Gary Lunn and Mark Gersmehl all from Whiteheart along with Bill Smiley doing some backup vocals and producing the album. This album has an excellent pop/rock sound and it was another album I missed in the 80’s but love it now. The CD version of this album had a bonus track Duet with Larry Norman doing a rocking version of Larry’s “Why Should The Devil Have All The Good Music”.

This was Geoff’s last solo album before putting together a band and being Geoff Moore and the Distance. There must be some correlation between this album being call The Distance and his subsequent band being named The Distance but I don’t know what it was. The band for this album consisted of Dan Huff, Gary Lunn and Mark Gersmehl all from Whteheart along with Bill Smiley doing some backup vocals and producing the album. This album has an excellent pop/rock sound and it was another album I missed in the 80’s but love it now. The CD version of this album had a bonus track Duet with Larry Norman doing a rocking version of Larry’s “Why Should The Devil Have All The Good Music”. There is actually a music video for that track also and we have it here;

Tracklist
1 – Winning Back The Rock – 3:19
2 – Never Wanna Go Back – 3:44
3 – Familiar Stranger – 3:17
4 – Tomorrow – 4:00
5 – Didn’t He – 5:47
6 – Face The Music – 4:31
7 – Trouble Tonight – 3:46
8 – Sooner Or Later – 3:27
9 – Obey – 4:42
10 – Inside Out – 3:55
CD Bonus Track
11 – Why Should The Devil Have All The Good Music – 4:03

Credits
Steven Curtis Chapman – Composer
Tommy Dorsey – Horn, Keyboards
Ric Florian – Vocals
Mark Gersmehl – Composer
Pam Mark Hall – Composer
Dann Huff – Guitar
Gordon Kennedy – Composer, Guitar
Brent King – Percussion
Gary Lunn – Bass
Randy Matthews – Composer
Marty McCall – Vocals
Chris McHugh – Drums
Geoff Moore – Composer, Primary Artist, Vocals
Farrell Morris – Percussion
Phil Naish – Keyboards
Dale Oliver – Composer, Slide Guitar
Gary Pigg – Vocals
John Slick – Organ
Billy Smiley – Composer, Producer, Vocals
James Stroud – Drums
Arlin Troyer – Composer
Mark Tucker – Photography

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Larry Norman And The Young Lions – Quiet Night – 1984

This is the only known release of “Larry Norman and The Young Lions.” The Young Lions didn’t become anything else, but I believe that this was one of the records where he used his brother Charly as one of the creative musicians. Charly toured with him on the Stop This Flight Tour, and around this time was working on a career, although we never did seem much of him on his own.

The lead-out groove on side one says (in addition to the serial number ARF-864), “Larry & Charly” and the lead-out groove on side two says The Young Lions “Quiet Night.” For all I know this might mean they were the only two musicians on the album. It wouldn’t surprise me.

Most of the songs on this record are written by Tom Howard. Larry added 2 of his own tracks on each side. (Sigrid Jane, I Don’t Wanna Lose You, and two “L’etude”).

This is one of two records where Larry focused on recording Tom’s songs. The other one is “Letter of the Law” which appears in the bARCHAEOLOGY set. Larry was producing Tom and trying to promote him, unsuccessfully. He recorded some of his songs in attempt to generate some interest and popularity for Tom’s records. Tom did have a couple of moderately successful albums but then switched to doing recordings more focused on just playing piano.

Quiet Night is often referenced as “Jamaican Import” but it was available in the US direct from Phydeaux. Perhaps it was popular in Jamaica.

Tracklist
1 – Iron And Steel
2 – Shine Your Light
3 – I Found Love
4 – Let The Master Make It Right
5 – Piano L’etude
6 – Sigrid Jane
7 – Stronger Love
8 – Farther On
9 – Come On In
10 – Drum L’etude
11 – I Don’t Wanna Lose You
12 – Jesus Is The Song Inside Of Me

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Larry Norman – In Another Land – 1976

This album was the one that changed everything for us. I don’t remember what year it was when we got it. Maybe 1980. Maybe 1978 even. After this we started seeking out music that was actually for us. This is part 3 of Larry’s Trilogy, but the first part we heard. Only Visiting This Planet and So Long Ago The Garden came later for us but when put all together, these 3 albums make the most famous parts of Larry’s body of work. There were many other albums released, but nearly all of them contained at least one song from the trilogy. Over the years there were several versions of this album released on CD. This version is the 93 version with 4 bonus tracks that we have included.

 

== 1 ==

The Rock That Doesn’t Roll starts out sounding like an alternate version of Johnny B. Goode. Chuck Berry’s song came out in 1958. The fact that we were listening to Larry’s album in the 80s made it a little confusing and a little old-sounding to me, but the fact is these songs had to have been written no later than the early 70s. Given that perspective, I say the songs have great staying power. considering that they didn’t get any “mainstream” attention until much later.

This version of I Love You is a completely different song than the one he recorded at Capitol Records with People!. Interesting that he kept the name, unlike with other songs where he went with Righteous Rocker #3. Even when producing Daniel Amos’ Horrendous Disc album, he managed to get their song called I Love You #19 to make it unique. Another part of the enigma for me.

== 2 ==

U.F.O. seems to be part of the 1970s fascination with aliens. There were plenty of movies out at the time on the topic and so this tied in well with popular culture. After Larry’s heart attack(s), his doctor apparently told him he couldn’t play with the band any more but he still played this song a lot. The guitar part fit well but when it came to the electronic sound effects he did thouse with his voice and it sounded funny, also very unexpected. The audience laughed and I don’t know if that was bad form on his part or theirs.

== 3 ==

I’ve Searched All Around

Larry talked about end times a lot. He seemed to have the view that the world was slowly decaying before our eyes, a popular Christian worldview in the 60s, 70, and 80s. Songs like this one were about building hope in Kingdom Come in spite of what we see going on around us. His ability to put such a dark message into a rich musical setting like this was perfect. The blues comes through often in Larry’s songs, although during the Trilogy period it was never a focus. This song comes across as a great upbeat blues tune if you listen just right.

== 4 ==

Righteous Rocker #3

Allegedly written in a stairwell while waiting to go onstage for a concert, this song has a quick flow that makes it sound stream-of-consciousness, just like he wrote it all in a quick rush like that. Larry recorded various of it, but this a capella one is the first one he put out there.

Listen for Larry doing his own background vocals on this song. His distinctive voice can’t hide. We hear this in a lot of his work, suggesting he was alone a lot when he was in the studio.

== 5 ==

Deja Vu

One of the things that made Larry a great songwriter is that he wrote about things that were part of regular life. He starts out discussing relationships between people, “brothers.” He compares it to our relationship with God and draws parallels that are easy to follow. Many of the Christian artists both then and now don’t have this skill. The abliity to draw a comparison between heaven and Earth is what Shakespeare described as poetry.

== 6 ==

I Am A Servant

“When you are lonely you’re the only one to blame.”

This is both misunderstood and a double-entendre. Larry was too savvy with words to put something like this out unintentionally. Read the sentence twice. If you are lonely, it’s your fault. If you are lonely, there is no-one for you to take it out on but yourself.

Larry does seem to have been lonely a lot. He had some famous fallings out with other people in the community, and he faced a lot of accusations from Christian media accusing him of being “secular.” Like Shot Down, this is him reflecting and telling us that he is following his calling.

== 7 ==

The Sun Began To Rain

Larry was a poet as well as a songwriter. He even had the title of Poet Laureate at one point, and that was a point of pride for him. He really seemed to enjoy laying on thick layers of metaphor like he does in this song, and he was a master at it.

== 8 ==

Shot Down

It seems like he had critics throughout all of his career. In this song he responds to criticism from Christians who questioned his faith and his motives. That questioning never went away as far as I can tell, but at the same time his contribution seems to be huge. If we didn’t know anything about Larry’s personal life then he seems to have given us a lot. Maybe the enigma is best left that way to some extent.

== 9 ==

Six Sixty Six

Subtitled Rosemary’s Baby on some records. This is the original release version and it was just called Six Sixty Six. End times fascination was a big thing in the churches in the 70s and 80s. I remmeber the movie “A Thief In the Night.” It was super scary and really an earlier version of those “Left Behind” movies that came out much later. This song plays into that narrative quite deeply and gives a great insight into the mood of the Church at the time. Side note: Larry’s song “I Wish We’d All Been Ready” was a staple of this movie genre. Larry also appeared in the movie The Blob in the 60s, wearing a cross and warning people. This was obviously a big topic on his mind.

== 10 ==

Diamonds

Diamonds and One Way were two songs on this record that seemed like one song, but clearly two. He could have labelled it either way. The two short pieces turn into one but there is a clear transition between them. As the title suggests, this is a commentary on materialism. Its position in the album works out perfectly to take all the things he has been telling us in the past ten songs and remind us what ought to be on our minds.

== 11 ==

One Way

The “One Way” sign was something in the 1960s Jesus Movement. Larry may or may not have been the origin of this, but it was simply one index finger pointed upward. The two finger peace sign was a sign of the times, and Larry’s typical fashion was to respond to current culture with something compatible but different, and clearly tied to his message and calling. Imagine Larry holding up one hand with his index finger pointed up, eyes closed, singing this song.

== 12 ==

Song For A Small Circle of Friends

Larry mentions a few people by name and by inference here. “Dear Bobby watch your fears all hide” refers to Bob Dylan. On this recording you hear the harmonica at that point to make it clearer, but in live versions he sang “Dear Dylan” sometimes, and he did the voice impersonation.

“Love to you Sir Stonehill” was sometimes “Love to Randy Stonehill” in live versions. They had a complicated relationship that I don’t think I can explain but obviously he wanted to reach out for some reason.

“McCartney on the Hoffner bass” is obviously Paul. Larry told the story live about meeting Paul McCartney at Capital Records while they were both on the label. Apparrently Paul said “I like your music.”

== 13 ==

Hymn to the Last Generation

Larry closes the album with an altar call. He could talk about earthly problems and relationships all through his work, but he always wanted to leave the right message. His concerts did not have altar calls, but at the end of his concerts, which tended to be relatively small when I saw him, he would tell a hall full of hundreds of people that after the concert they could come backstage and talk to him if they wanted to. He would offer to help people and pray with them, in person. I went back there. He meant it.

Tracklist
1 – The Rock That Doesn’t Roll – 3:33
2 – I Love You – 3:03
3 – U.F.O. – 2:48
4 – I’ve Searched All Around – 3:19
5 – Righteous Rocker #3 – 0:47
6 – Deja Vu: (If God Is My Father) – 1:21
7 – Deja Vu-Continued: (Why Don’t You Look Into Jesus) – 2:38
8 – I Am A Servant – 3:09
9 – The Sun Began To Rain – 1:15
10 – Shot Down – 1:59
11 – Six Sixty Six – 2:30
12 – Diamonds – 1:37
13 – One Way – 2:20
14 – Song For A Small Circle Of Friends – 3:43
15 – Hymn To The Last Generation – 1:48
Bonus Tracks
16 – Looking For The Footprints – 2:33
17 – Strong Love, Strange Peace – 3:58
18 – Dreams On A Grey Afternoon – 1:00
19 – Let That Tape Keep Rolling (Live From Greenbelt) – 6:19

CREDITS
Larry Norman – vocals, harmonies, guitar, percussion, piano, producer,
Randy Stonehill – guitar and backing vocals
Jon Linn – guitars
Dudley Moore – piano
Mark Walker – drums
Tim Ayres – bass guitar
John Michael Talbot – banjo
Andy Johns – engineer
Tom Trefethen – assistant engineer
Solid Rock studios – pre-production recording location
Mama Jo’s – recording location
Sunset Sound – recording location
A&M, Studio 3 – mastering location

Companies, etc.
Phonographic Copyright (p) – Solid Rock Records
Copyright (c) – Solid Rock Records
Recorded At – Solid Rock Recording Studios
Recorded At – Mama Jo’s
Recorded At – Sunset Sound
Mastered At – A&M Mastering Studios
Record Company – Solid Rock Productions, Inc.
Copyright (c) – Beechwood Music Corp.
Copyright (c) – Glenwood Music Corp.
Published By – J. C. Love Publishing Co.
Published By – Strawbed Music

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Jesus Sound Explosion – 1972

It’s not too often I get to post an album with Johnny Cash on it but this is the one. This album could not be purchased but instead was sent to attendees of the 1972 EXPLO music festival. The EXPLO festival was put on by Campus Crusade for Christ and there were actually 7 days to the festival in Dallas TX. If you were there you could order the album and it would be mailed to you later. The festival was able to get all the performer’s record companies to allow this album to be distributed. I suspect one of the conditions was that it would not be commercially sold. This album has the broadest style of performers I’ve ever heard. Everything from Larry Norman (Rock) to Connie Smith (Country) to Willa Mae Dorsey (Southern Gospel). It’s an enjoyable album but the abrupt genre changes can be a bit startling. This album is a piece of CCM history. Were you there? Leave a comment below and tell us what it was like.

Printed on the jacket;
“This album is not for sale. This album was produced for the sole purpose of offering to the EXPLO ’72 television audience musical reminders of this historic congress. This album is sent to individuals who let the ministry of Campus Crusade For Christ International know that they are interested in receiving this album. Material on this album was recorded live at EXPLO ’72 in Dallas, Texas, June 12-17, 1972. Special arrangements with the artists and their record companies have made this album possible.”

Tracklist
1 – Johnny Cash – I See Men As Trees Walkin’ – 3:18
2 – Armageddon Experience – One Way – 3:35
3 – Randy Matthews – Didn’t He – 4:26
4 – Andraé Crouch & The Disciples – I’m Satisfied – 3:37
5 – Larry Norman – Sweet Song Of Salvation – 3:55
6 – Great Commission Company – Anticipation – 3:05
7 – Danny Lee & The Children Of Truth – Spread A Little Love Around – 2:56
8 – Connie Smith – Plenty Of Time – 4:13
9 – Forerunners – Lord – 2:44
10 – Willa Dorsey – I Have The Joy In My Soul – 2:45
11 – Love Song – A Love Song (Narration Of I Corinthians 13) – 5:40
12 – The Speer Family – The King Is Coming – 3:48

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Salvation Air Force – Strangers In A Strange Land – 1977

Wikipedia described Salvation Air Force as “Canada’s first Christian rock band”. Well as a Canadian I had never heard of them so my research started. Looking at their history I guess they were a little before my time as I was only 11 years old when this album came out. The band consisted of Michael and Donnie Gossett along with some of the biggest names in Christian music of the time. Unfortunately Michael has now passed but I have spoken at length with Donnie and consider him a friend. He informed me that brothers Alex and Beau MacDougall were instrumental ib the band (see what I did there). Alex was also a member of CCM bands The Way, Daniel Amos, The Randy Stonehill Band, and The Larry Norman Band. Alex continues working on CCM music to this day producing and engineering albums. Beau was a member of Wing & A Prayer, Horizon, The Larry Norman Band, Cliff Richard’s band, Reba Rambo’s band and many other CCM bands. Donnie Gossett has also performed live with Danniebelle, The Imperials, Reba Rambo, Don Moen, Ron Kenoly and continues making music today, you can find his albums on the Interwebs, check them out. All in all reading the credits of this album is like a reading of CCM royalty if there ever was. As for the album it has an easy listening feel but I have been assured the band had a much harder rock sound in the day. Give this album a listen and you will be hearing a piece of CCM history and a very important piece if Canadian CCM history.

Tracklist
1 – I Can Feel His Presence – 2:33
2 – Complete And Alive – 2:45
3 – Don’t Make Me Choose – 5:27
4 – If God Is My Father – 6:25
5 – You’re All I Want – 4:39
6 – It’s Jesus In Me – 4:25
7 – Special Friend – 3:01
8 – You Have Blessed Me – 2:33
9 – Accident – 4:22

Credits
Dana Angle – Producer, Assistant Engineer, Guitars, Background Vocals
Dave Coy – Bass
Sandra Crouch – Background Vocals
Joy Strange Cull – Background Vocals
Mike Escalante – Keyboards
Christine Franklin – Background Vocals
Joe Gallo – Background Vocals
Donnie Gossett – Producer, Songwriter, Arrangements, Guitars, Piano, Vocals
Judy Gossett – Arrangements, Percussion, Vocals
Michael Leon Gossett – Producer, Songwriter, Bass, Vocals
Bruce Herring – Background Vocals
Tom Howard – Keyboards
Peter Johnson – Drums
Buddy King – Engineer, Mixed
Alex MacDougall – Drums, Percussion
Larry Norman – Producer, Songwriter, Arrangements, Background Vocals
John Pantano – Guitar
Al Perkins – Pedal Steel Guitar
Nancye Short – Background Vocals
Jim Stipech – String Arrangements, Conductor
Randy Stonehill – Guitars

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Steve Camp – Sayin’ It With Love – 1978

Steve Camp’s debut album came out in 1978, at a time when Larry Norman seems to have been between record labels. Larry wrote two of the songs on this album, and co-wrote one with Steve. Had this been a couple of years earlier or later, it seems likely that it would have come out on Solid Rock Records or Phydeaux Records. Interestingly, “If I Were A Singer” is credited here as a co-write but on Larry’s own album (Gathered Moments, 1998), it is credited as a Larry Norman song and noted as previously unreleased. The version here has some differences, including significant lyrical differences but certainly it is another version of the same song. From Larry’s liner notes on Gathered Moments:

IF I WERE A SINGER – Originally penned for an aspiring young Steve Camp for his 1978 SAYING IT WITH LOVE lp, this 1977 live performance features Larry’s original lyrics.

Tracklist
1 – Sayin’ It With Love – 2:48
2 – Me – 3:22
3 – If I Were A Singer – 5:06
4 – Gather In His Name – 2:55
5 – Let Not Your Heart Be Troubled – 4:30
6 – God Loves You – 1:48
7 – Good News – 4:12
8 – Song For Mom – 4:55
9 – Lord Make Me Humble – 3:39
10 – Strong Love, Strange Peace With Diamonds – 4:56
11 – Tell Everybody – 1:57

Credits
Alto Saxophone – Steve Eisen
Arranged By [Background Vocal Arrangements] – Louis DuChane, Steven J. Camp*
Arranged By [Strings] – Paul Libman
Backing Vocals – Butch Patrini, Debby Wolgemuth, Frank Barbalace, Josi DeChristopher, Louis DuChane, Steven J. Camp, Steve Wyer, Vicki Hubbley*
Bass – Rusty Taylor, Sidney Sims
Co-producer [Production Assistance] – Paul Bogush, Jr.
Drums – Jackie Skalow, Ron Kapland, Tom Ratdke
Electric Piano, Synthesizer [Polymood, Minimoog], Organ – Pat Leonard*
Engineer – Alan Kubica, Hank Newberger
Engineer [Back-up] – Gary Elghammer, Tom Hansen*
Graphics [Lettering], Design – Martin Donald
Guitar – Bruce Gaitch, Danny Leek, Frank Barbalace Lead Vocals – Steven J. Camp
Mastered By – Greg Calbi
Mixed By [Mix-Down Engineer] – Alan Kubica*
Percussion – Brenda Mitchell, Louis DuChane, Ron Kapland
Photography By – Jim Whitmer
Piano – Pat Leonard, Paul Libman Producer, Arranged By – Steven J. Camp
Strings – Arnold Roth, Elliott M. Golub, Everett Zlatoff-Mirsky, Harold D. Klatz, Rodger Moulton, Sol A. Bobrov

Companies, etc.
Phonographic Copyright (p) – Word, Inc.
Copyright (c) – Word, Inc.
Recorded At – Chicago Recording Company
Mastered At – Sterling Sound

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Larry Norman – (almost) So Long Ago The Garden (but not quite) and the MGM Singles – 1980

So Long Ago The garden was part 2 of Larry’s famous trilogy, set between Only Visiting This Planet and In Another Land.

In 1980, Phydeaux released something called “(almost) So Long Ago The Garden and the MGM singles”

This pressing has most of the same tracks as the original 1973 album, but there are a few differences:
1. “Up In Canada” is included, which was a radio single, but not part of the original album
2. “Christmastime” incldues a short intro by some sort of circus entertainer from the sound of it
3. The order of various tracks is changed. “Christmastime” leads of the album instead of “Fly Fly Fly”
3. “Peacepollutionrevolution” is included, which was not on the original album
4. “It’s The Same Old Story” is called “The Same Old Story” on this version
5. “The Same Old Story” is on both records, but with different lyrics
6. “Meet Me At The Airport (Fly Fly Fly)” is just called “Fly Fly Fly” on this version

 

Tracklist
1 – Christmastime
2 – Fly Fly Fly
3 – She’s A Dancer
4 – The Same Old Story
5 – Baroquen Spirits
6 – Up In Canada
7 – Be Careful What You Sign
8 – Lonely By Myself
9 – Peacepollutionrevolution
10 – Nightmare

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Larry Norman – So Long Ago The Garden – 1973

This is the 20th anniversary edition of the CD, released in 1993. Being one of Larry’s seminal works, there were many versions of this album released, including at least two other CD releases with different bonus tracks. There were several vinyl versions released as well, including “Almost So Long Ago The Garden” which had only the highlights from this album, plus some other tracks added.

So Long Ago The Garden is part 2 of Larry’s trilogy, between Only Visiting This Planet and In Another Land. These three albums contain a big part of his life’s work, and we find that compilations and live albums tend to draw on these three heavily.

It opens with “Fly Fly Fly” which is a song about the jet-set lifestyle of a rock star, in which he talks about having to leave his wife while away on trips. “Fly Fly Fly / My baby gets me high / I spend too much time in taxicabs / Please don’t ask me why”

Truthfully, Larry didn’t like to be asked “why” on certain things, so this song is probably more honest than it seems in a few places.

It opens with “I took a plane to Minnesota / To see my lady love” but in a live recording, it was captured as “To see my Pamela,” which is a reference to his wife at the time. Perhaps this song was meant to be a reassurance to her.

Same Old Story has a few different versions floating around. There are different studio recordings of it with different lyrics, all released in the 1970s. The differences are from things like “You hope she doesn’t break your heart” changed to “You know she’s gonna break your heart.”

Lonely By Myself became a classic for a lot of fans. As the title suggests, it’s one that is easier to listen to alone.

Notably, Soul Survivor was one track that isn’t included on all versions of the vinyl pressing, but it is on the original and on the CD re-releases.

The cover of this album went through some revisions. It’s a cut-out of Larry, essentially a silhouette, but filled in with a lion lying down, and the colour of the lion scene was close enough to a skin tone that people decided this might be a nude picture. It’s not really a picture at all, it’s an outline, and anyway it’s only from the waist up. The cover was changed for the benefit of sales in Bible bookstores, and then eventually the re-issues used the original cover again.

This one is Larry in his prime, and should not be missed.

Tracklist
1 – Fly Fly Fly
2 – It’s The Same Old Story
3 – Lonely By Myself
4 – Be Careful What You Sign
5 – Baroquen Spirits
6 – Christmastime
7 – She’s A Dancer
8 – Soul Survivor
9 – Nightmare #71
CD Bonus Tracks
10 – If God Is My Father (Rough Mix)
11 – Up In Canada (1973 Single)
12 – Dear Malcolm, Dear Alwyn (Demo)

Credits
Acoustic Guitar – Randy*
Acoustic Guitar [12 String Epiphone], Classical Guitar [Segovia], Piano [Steinway Piano], Electric Piano – Larry Norman
Backing Vocals – The Hollywood Street Choir
Bass – Dave*
Drums – Mike*
Guitar [Lead Guitar] – Mick*
Harmonica – Graham*
Percussion – Roger, Tony
Piano – Bob*
Piano [Steinway Piano], Organ [C3 Hammond Organ], Electric Piano [Wurlitzer Electric Piano], Clavinet [Hohner Clavinet], Synthesizer [Mini-moog Synthesizer] – Rod*
Producer – Jon Miller (4), Rod Edwards, Roger Hand
Saxophone – Malcolm, Roger
Violin – Graham*
Written-By – Larry Norman, Randy Stonehill (tracks: B1)

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Larry Norman – Streams of White Light into Darkened Corners – 1977

Larry released this album in 1977 and it was labelled “Part 1.” Like many of his projects, the rest of it was never released.

The idea here seems to be to “expose” the pseudo-Christian songs that were radio hits in the 60s and 70s. Larry seemed to feel that they were exploiting the Jesus Movement for profit.

Randy Stonehill plays the part of the radio DJ, and the two of them record covers of popular songs that many people considered religious in spite of the rest of the bands’ repretoire. The songs are not recorded very seriously, and you can hear them making fun and holding back laughter in a couple of places.

From the back of the jacket:

This album was originally a newspaper article, but several different publishers backed down from printing it so I decided to record the music that is described in the article and release the soundtrack to the “newspaper movie.”

This is a Satirical Record and anyone who doesn’t have a sense of humor that leans toward the surreal, a cursory interest in pop music, and a healthy indifference/disdain for ego-lipped disc jockeys should definitely stay away from this album.
Larry Norman, 1974″

Track Listing:
A1 Spirit In The Sky Written-By – Norman Greenbaum
A2 Put Your Hand In The Hand Written-By – Gene MacLellan
A3 Bridge Over Troubled Water Written-By – Paul Simon
A4 Let It Be Written-By – Lennon-McCartney
A5 My Sweet Lord Written-By – George Harrison
A6 Presence Of The Lord Written-By – Eric Clapton
B1 I Think He’s Hiding Written-By – Randy Newman
B2 He Gives Us All His Love Written-By – Randy Newman
B3 Stranger In A Strange Land Written-By – Leon Russell
B4 Prince Of Peace Written-By – Greg Dempsey, Leon Russell
B5 Song For Adam Written-By – Jackson Browne
B6 Shine A Light Written-By – Jagger-Richard*

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Mark Heard – Stop The Dominoes – 1981

Mark Heard created a tradition of going the extra mile on his records. He wrote lyrics that had real honesty packed in tight, and yet he still managed drop some tongue-in-cheek one-liners. The effect was that when he was cheeky, you still had to take him seriously. Stop the Dominoes is a classic version of this.

He had a lot to say. The liner notes are incredible. CCM records routinely included all the lyrics printed out on the sleeve, but in addition, Mark included 2 full pages of small print, written from his heart to his fans. Mark had a passion for reality. You can hear it in his song lyrics, and these notes include some personal diary entries from his tour stops through Europe. It’s hard to imagine this kind of thoughtful writing being shared with fans now.

These notes were written on his travels, and later collated into this form, typeset and arranged, sent out to print, manufactured, distributed to stores, and then finally brought home to read. I hope a lot of people read them, but then again, I know. In 1982 when we bought records, we read everything.

There was no Twitter feed. The Internet didn’t exist in any consumer form at that time. Mark died in 1992, well before fandom was available online. Long before we would be able to follow someone’s thoughts as they had them.

Sure, we can follow people on social media now, but that’s a different thing. Online posts are so disposable because they are so temporal. Reading someone’s deliberate writing, something that they know they would have to work on, proofread, and only be able to publish to the world once a year – that’s special in a different way.

Mark Heard was one of the most thoughtful songwriters, and gone much too soon and much too young.

Track Listing:
A1 One Of The Dominoes 4:23
A2 Stranded At The Station 3:30
A3 You Could Lie To Me 4:02
A4 One Night Stand 2:52
A5 I’m Crying Again 3:29
B1 Stuck In The Middle 4:39
B2 Call Me The Fool 3:11
B3 I’m In Chains 3:25
B4 Lonely One 4:35
B5 To See Your Face 3:31

Credits:
Arranged By – Mark Heard
Backing Vocals – Dave De Coup Crank, Larry Norman, Leslie Phillips, Little Bobby Emmons, Randy Stonehill
Bass – John Patitucci
Electric Guitar – Tony Eisenbarger
Electric Guitar, Lead Guitar, Slide Guitar, Keyboards, Backing Vocals – Mark Heard
Engineer – Jonathan David Brown
Fiddle – Buddy Spicher
Keyboards – Tom Howard
Percussion – Alex MacDougall
Producer – Mark Heard
Saxophone – Karl Denson
Steel Guitar [Pedal Steel] – Sonny Garrish
Written By – Mark Heard

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